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AdamSafire pulls Dodocase recommendation

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Due to durability issues AdamSafire no longer recommends the Dodocase for the iPad.  Dodocase. Check out the full article here.

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August 9, 2010 at 5:08 pm

Adam Safire's Blog becomes AdamSafire

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The Adam Safire's Blog sites are consolidating to single site named AdamSafire. Please check out the new site.

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July 28, 2010 at 6:34 pm

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OpenStack allows open source cloud computing

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Rackspace and NASA have joined together to push OpenStack.  OpenStack is an open source project to provide cloud computing and object storage. They will be going in to competition with VMware and Microsoft for the the cloud computing platform. The Compute and Storage projects are developer preview only and currently available. They expect the initial release for storage to be in mid September and Compute a month later. According to a report from Gigaom, “What Android is to smartphone operating systems, we want OpenStack to be for the cloud” says Rackspace’s Lew Moorman.

-AS
AdamSafire

From the Openstack website…

What the software does: The goal of OpenStack is to allow any organization to create and offer cloud computing capabilities using open source software running on standard hardware. OpenStack Compute is software for automatically creating and managing large groups of virtual private servers. OpenStack Storage is software for creating redundant, scalable object storage using clusters of commodity servers to store terabytes or even petabytes of data.


Why open matters: All of the code for OpenStack is freely available under the Apache 2.0 license. Anyone can run it, build on it, or submit changes back to the project. We strongly believe that an open development model is the only way to foster badly-needed cloud standards, remove the fear of proprietary lock-in for cloud customers, and create a large ecosystem that spans cloud providers.


Who it’s for: Institutions and service providers with physical hardware that they’d like to use for large-scale cloud deployments. (Additionally, companies who have specific requirements that prevent them from running in a public cloud.)


How it’s being used today: Organizations like Rackspace Hosting and NASA are using OpenStack technologies to manage tens of thousands of compute instances and petabytes of storage.


Timeline: Openstack was announced July 19th, 2010. While many components of OpenStack have been used in production for years, we are in the very early stages of our efforts to offer these technologies broadly as open source software. Early code is now available on LaunchPad, with an inital release for OpenStack Storage expected in mid-September and an initial release for OpenStack Compute expected in mid-October.

Written by adamsafire

July 19, 2010 at 9:21 pm

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Evernote opens app store

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Evernote is one of my favorite applications. I use it on my Mac, PC, iPhone, iPad and Blackberry. The concept of getting to your information whereever you are with whatever device you are holding at the time is awesome. -AS

from VentureBeat

 

Evernote, a Mountain View-based startup devoted to helping people remember everything, is maturing as a platform with the launch of an app store today.

Called Trunk, the store has about 100 apps or add-ons from 67 companies, covering everything from games to productivity apps to add-ons that let you create physical, personal scrapbooks. About 30 of them are brand new and come from the company’s 2,000 developer partners.

“The next phase of Evernote is about being smarter and giving you the ability to leverage your memories to support everyday activities like scheduling, cooking and writing,” said chief executive Phil Libin. The company is still working out details of a revenue sharing program. There will be an affiliate program coming later this year.

Many of the Evernote partners that demoed today weren’t companies that were exclusively dependent on Evernote. They were startups like Seesmic or very large corporations like SAP.

Read the whole article here

Written by adamsafire

July 14, 2010 at 10:49 pm

Varrow encourages engineers to blog

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I have found some very helpful information on the the Varrow Blogs website. Varrow is a North Carolina Vmware solutions provider that encourges their engineers to post a weekly blog. The idea is to share the expertise learned from the filed with the IT community as a whole. The project was the brainchild of Varrow CTO Jeremiah Cook who saw it as a way to document what the engineers were learning as a group and make it available to everyone.  The blogs range from happenings at Cisco Live to instructions on how to prep an XP machine for Vmware view.

 

The Varrow Blogs (started 2008) at www.varrowblogs.com are still getting lots of attention and will remain to be our largest social networking presence.  If you didn't know, all Varrow engineers create a blog entry weekly.  In these blogs, they share their Varrow engagement experiences, talk about whats new and just share their opinions.  The theme of the blogs follows the focus of Varrow, with heavy emphasis on storage, virtualization, backup and disaster recovery.  Many of our customers and our peers have found these blogs very helpful.

Since then, we added a company twitter site, a facebook account and we also have a page on LinkedIn and Youtube. Hopefully these pages will be just as popular.

 

Please check this out.  

Great stuff.

-AS 

Written by adamsafire

July 3, 2010 at 4:54 am

Will FaceTime use your cell minutes?

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Silicon Alley Insider reports that Apple's FaceTime video calling feature coming on iPhone 4 will not tap into customers' allotments of cellular minutes. Although the feature operates only over Wi-Fi for the time being, a FaceTime session can be initiated from within a phone call, leaving some observers wondering whether the phone connection would be maintained in the background as a fallback in case the video call fails, but eating up cellular minutes while doing so.
 
 
"The voice call ends as soon as the FaceTime call connects," Apple tells us. "The FaceTime call is over Wi-Fi so does not use carrier minutes."
 
Once the feature does go live on cellular networks, today's report points out that Apple and service providers will have to determine whether FaceTime sessions are billed as minutes, data, or both, or even a completely new category of consumption."The voice call ends as soon as the FaceTime call connects," Apple tells us. "The FaceTime call is over Wi-Fi so does not use carrier minutes."
 
Apple CEO Steve Jobs noted during his introduction of iPhone 4 and FaceTime at the company's Worldwide Developers Conference earlier this month that the company will be working with carriers to allow FaceTime over cellular networks but that it will remain Wi-Fi-only at least through the end of the year.
 
-via Macrumors
 
 
Apple CEO Steve Jobs noted during his introduction of iPhone 4 and FaceTime at the company's Worldwide Developers Conference earlier this month that the company will be working with carriers to allow FaceTime over cellular networks but that it will remain Wi-Fi-only at least through the end of the year.
 
Once the feature does go live on cellular networks, today's report points out that Apple and service providers will have to determine whether FaceTime sessions are billed as minutes, data, or both, or even a completely new category of consumption.Silicon Alley Insider reports that Apple's FaceTime video calling feature coming on iPhone 4 will not tap into customers' allotments of cellular minutes. Although the feature operates only over Wi-Fi for the time being, a FaceTime session can be initiated from within a phone call, leaving some observers wondering whether the phone connection would be maintained in the background as a fallback in case the video call fails, but eating up cellular minutes while doing so.
"The voice call ends as soon as the FaceTime call connects," Apple tells us. "The FaceTime call is over Wi-Fi so does not use carrier minutes."
 
Apple CEO Steve Jobs noted during his introduction of iPhone 4 and FaceTime at the company's Worldwide Developers Conference earlier this month that the company will be working with carriers to allow FaceTime over cellular networks but that it will remain Wi-Fi-only at least through the end of the year.
 
Once the feature does go live on cellular networks, today's report points out that Apple and service providers will have to determine whether FaceTime sessions are billed as minutes, data, or both, or even a completely new category of consumption.Silicon Alley Insider reports that Apple's FaceTime video calling feature coming on iPhone 4 will not tap into customers' allotments of cellular minutes. Although the feature operates only over Wi-Fi for the time being, a FaceTime session can be initiated from within a phone call, leaving some observers wondering whether the phone connection would be maintained in the background as a fallback in case the video call fails, but eating up cellular minutes while doing so.
"The voice call ends as soon as the FaceTime call connects," Apple tells us. "The FaceTime call is over Wi-Fi so does not use carrier minutes."
 
Apple CEO Steve Jobs noted during his introduction of iPhone 4 and FaceTime at the company's Worldwide Developers Conference earlier this month that the company will be working with carriers to allow FaceTime over cellular networks but that it will remain Wi-Fi-only at least through the end of the year.
 
Once the feature does go live on cellular networks, today's report points out that Apple and service providers will have to determine whether FaceTime sessions are billed as minutes, data, or both, or even a completely new category of consumption.Silicon Alley Insider reports that Apple's FaceTime video calling feature coming on iPhone 4 will not tap into customers' allotments of cellular minutes. Although the feature operates only over Wi-Fi for the time being, a FaceTime session can be initiated from within a phone call, leaving some observers wondering whether the phone connection would be maintained in the background as a fallback in case the video call fails, but eating up cellular minutes while doing so.
"The voice call ends as soon as the FaceTime call connects," Apple tells us. "The FaceTime call is over Wi-Fi so does not use carrier minutes."
 
Apple CEO Steve Jobs noted during his introduction of iPhone 4 and FaceTime at the company's Worldwide Developers Conference earlier this month that the company will be working with carriers to allow FaceTime over cellular networks but that it will remain Wi-Fi-only at least through the end of the year.
 
Once the feature does go live on cellular networks, today's report points out that Apple and service providers will have to determine whether FaceTime sessions are billed as minutes, data, or both, or even a completely new category of consumption.

Written by adamsafire

June 21, 2010 at 1:49 pm

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Is the iPad ready for business?

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Apple's iPad has been a huge hit with consumers. Early testing and common sense indicate that it should work very well in the enterprise. The biggest problem facing the device isn’t the device or its functionality, it is the lack of a plan to manage the 3G service and ownership and deployment of apps from a bulk standpoint. This makes business adoption a very manually intensive and non-centralized exercise. Which is okay for a few test users but expanding out to even a dozen would prove very difficult. 

You can use the iPhone configuration utility to setup environmental settings like corporate email, wifi, restrictions and VPN connections. The problem begins when you start to want to purchase apps and the 3G service.

Currently, there is no way to add the pay as you go service to a corporate AT&T plan.  So each users 3G account has to be placed on a month-to-month plan that is tied to a credit card. There is no way currently to add the charges to an existing AT&T account.

On the apps front, I haven’t found a way to install apps without setting up an individual account for each user again secured with a credit card. Controlling app updates and purchasing falls into the hands of the individual user not the company. While users need to have the flexibility to add apps there needs to be a way to monitor and standardize apps across multiple users.     

 

The iPad is a device that holds promise for business users. It is clear that non-business users were the first targets. Apple and AT&T explain the device is still brand new and integration with corporate wireless accounts and app management is in the works. For folks who want an iPad at work that is not fast enough.

 

-AS

Written by adamsafire

June 15, 2010 at 3:12 am

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